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October 20, 2021 | 00:00

System Performance - Chapter 4

When reading the Systems Performance: Enterprise and the Cloud, 2nd Edition (2020) by Brendan Gregg, I saw that each chapter has an Exercises section with a set of questions. This series of blogs will be my attempt to answer them and also give additional links I’ve read whilst reading the chapter. The answers might not be correct, not detailed but this is to help me explain what I learned to make sure I understand it. Read more

October 13, 2021 | 00:00

System Performance - Chapter 3

When reading the Systems Performance: Enterprise and the Cloud, 2nd Edition (2020) by Brendan Gregg, I saw that each chapter has an Exercises section with a set of questions. This series of blogs will be my attempt to answer them and also give additional links I’ve read whilst reading the chapter. The answers might not be correct, not detailed but this is to help me explain what I learned to make sure I understand it. Read more

October 4, 2021 | 00:00

System Performance - Chapter 2

When reading the Systems Performance: Enterprise and the Cloud, 2nd Edition (2020) by Brendan Gregg, I saw that each chapter has an Exercises section with a set of questions. This series of blogs will be my attempt to answer them and also give additional links I’ve read whilst reading the chapter. The answers might not be correct, not detailed but this is to help me explain what I learned to make sure I understand it. Read more

May 28, 2021 | 04:50

Go Performance Tools Cheat Sheet

Go has a lot of tools available for you to understand where your application might be spending CPU time or allocating memory. I don’t use these tools daily so I always end up searching for the same thing every time. This post aims to be a reference document for everything that Go has to provide. We’ll be using https://gitlab.com/steveazz-blog/go-performance-tools-cheat-sheet as a demo project and there are 3 implementations of the same thing, one more performant than the other. Read more

April 3, 2021 | 00:00

import "context"

What can you do when you import "context" inside of your go project? Looking at the source code it’s a fairly small package and provides a small api. We also see this package imported almost everywhere and the standard library also uses it. context provides the following functionality: Cancellation Context scope values Deadlines/Timeouts There are two things that you need to keep in mind when you are using context: Read more